Search
Generic filters
a

American Stroke Foundation

Caregiver ResourcesDiffusing Family Conflict as a Caregiver

Diffusing Family Conflict as a Caregiver

When a person has a stroke it is not only the person with stroke who is impacted by the event, but the entire family.

Family Conflict Post-Stroke (0:16-4:54)

Providing care for a loved one can bring about differences in opinion in regard to care and recovery of the person with stroke resulting in conflict. Each person impacted by stroke handles grief, change, and stress differently which can prove to be challenging to navigate.

Learn ways to prevent conflict: identify the issue, be honest, use “I” statements, share responsibility, value everyone’s ideas and opinions, and more.

Tips for Siblings to Prevent Conflict (4:55-6:10)

Come to a consensus among siblings to share responsibilities, stay in touch and communicate, do not be afraid to ask for what you need, and consider outside help to give you all a much-needed break and time for yourself.

Tips for Spouses or Partners to Prevent Conflict (6:11-7:31)

Discuss expectations, make time for togetherness, enlist your spouse’s help with caregiving tasks or tasks around your home such as cleaning or cooking, and keep communication open.

Tips for Parents to Minimize Impact of Caregiving on Children (7:32-9:09)

1 in 8 Americans between the age of 40-60 are raising children and taking care of a parent or relative at the same time. This demographic of caregivers is called “the sandwich generation” due to the fact they are a generation “sandwiched” between 2 caregiving roles. Parents who are in this role can have concerns about splitting time between these two roles and the impact it could have on their children. To help combat the impact do your best to preserve family life, involve kids in appropriate ways, let kids voice their feelings, and dedicate time to each child.

Tips for Caregivers on How to Preserve Their Relationship with the Care Recipient (9:10-10:27)

Respect your loved one’s wishes, make adjustments to activities or routines you once had prior to stroke, present a unified front of caregivers on your care team, and find sources of positivity each day.

Closing Thoughts (10:28-11:01)

Respect your loved one’s wishes, make adjustments to activities or routines you once had prior to stroke, present a unified front of caregivers on your care team, and find sources of positivity each day.

Post a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

An organization dedicated to helping stroke survivors and their caregivers improve their overall quality of life. Join us for great advice, guidance, community and activities.

Contact us

6405 Metcalf Avenue, Suite 214
Overland Park, KS 66202

(913) 649-1776